Kobach Used Anti-Mexican Immigrant Book In His Course Curriculum

July 15, 2010 11:52 am ET

As a professor at the University of Missouri-Kansas City law school, Kris Kobach assigned students the book Who Are We? by Samuel Huntington.  The text, written by Kobach's mentor Huntington, includes passages arguing that Mexican immigration is the cause of the immigration problems in the United States, that all Mexican immigrants should learn English and convert to Evangelical Protestantism, and cautions readers against the rising threat of a Reconquista.

Kobach, UMKC & Samuel Huntington

Kobach Is A Law Professor At The University Of Missouri-Kansas City. According to the biography page of his 2010 Secretary of State campaign website: "Kris Kobach is a Professor of Law at UMKC... He joined the UMKC School of Law faculty in 1996...He has also published numerous articles in political science, constitutional law, immigration law, and legal history... Professor Kobach teaches Constitutional Law I, Constitutional Law II, Immigration Law, American Legal History, and Legislation." [KrisKobach.org, accessed 6/23/10]

Kobach's Immigration Law And Policy Course Syllabus Assigns Excerpts From Who Are We? By Samuel Huntington. The syllabus for Professor Kobach's Spring Term 2010 Immigration Law and Policy course at the University of Missouri-Kansas City Law School includes "excerpts" from the 2004 book Who Are We? : The Challenges To America's National Identity by Samuel P. Huntington. [University of Missouri-Kansas City Law School, 1/29/10]

  • Huntington Was Kobach's Mentor And Advisor At Harvard. According to The Pitch: "At Harvard, Kobach found a mentor: Samuel Huntington, a professor of political science. Huntington's latest book, 2004's Who Are We: The Challenges to America's National Identity, argues that immigration trends, most notably among Hispanics, could endanger American culture. With Huntington as his adviser, Kobach earned the Harvard prize for the best student thesis in 1989." [The Pitch, 1/4/07]

Highlights From Who Are We?

Huntington Quoted Philosopher Who Argues That "The Educational And Other Deficiencies Of Mexican-Americans" Are Explained By The Saying "Tomorrow It Will Be Ready." According to Who Are We? : The Challenges to America's National Identity: "In 1999, the Mexican philosopher Armando Cíntora explained the educational and other deficiencies of Mexican-Americans by their attitudes expressed in three sayings: 'ahí se va' ('Who cares? That is good enough'); 'Mañana se lo tengo' ('Tomorrow it will be ready'); and 'El vale madrismo' ('Nothing is really worthwhile')." [Who Are We?: The Challenges to America's National Identity, pp. 254, 2004, parentheses original]

Huntington: Mexican-Americans Will Share In The American Dream "Only If They Dream In English." According to Who Are We? : The Challenges to America's National Identity: "Lionel Sosa ends his book, The Americano Dream, of advice to aspiring Hispanic entrepreneurs, with the words: 'The Americano dream? It exists, it is realistic, and it is there for all of us to share.' He is wrong. There is no Americano dream. There is only the American dream created by an Anglo-Protestant society. Mexican-Americans will share in that dream and in that society only if they dream in English." [Who Are We? : The Challenges to America's National Identity, pp. 256, 2004, emphasis original]

Mexican Immigration Threatens To Divide United States Into A Country Of "Two Peoples." According to Who Are We? : The Challenges to America's National Identity: "In the late twentieth century, developments occurred that, if continued, could change America into a culturally bi-furcated Anglo-Hispanic society with two national languages... The continuation of high levels of Mexican and Hispanic immigration plus the low rates of assimilation of these immigrants into American society and culture could eventually change America into a country of two languages, two cultures, and two peoples." [Who Are We?: The Challenges to America's National Identity, pp. 221, 256, 2004]

Huntington Warns Of The Looming Reconquista. According to Who Are We? : The Challenges to America's National Identity:

Mexican immigration is leading toward the demographic reconquista of areas Americans took from Mexico by force in the 1830s and 1840s, Mexicanizing them in a manner comparable to, although different from, the Cubanization that has occurred in southern Florida...

Mexico is the only country that the United States has invaded, occupied its capital, placing Marines in the 'halls of Montezuma,' and then annexed half its territory. Mexicans do not forget these events. Quite understandably, they feel that they have special rights in these territories...history shows that serious potential for conflict exists when people in one country start to refer to territory in a neighboring country in proprietary terms and to assert special rights and claims to that territory...

Mexican-Americans, in turn, argue that the Southwest was taken from them by military aggression in the 1840s, and that the time for la reconquista has arrived. Demographically, socially, and culturally that is well under way. Conceivably this could lead to a move to reunite these territories with Mexico. [Who Are We? : The Challenges to America's National Identity, pp. 221, 229-230, 246, 2004, emphasis original]

Huntington Calls Mexican Immigration "Unprecedented" Even Though It Is Smaller Than Past Migrations. According to Who Are We? : The Challenges to America's National Identity:  "contemporary Mexican immigration is unprecedented in American history...In these three decades, Mexicans accounted for 14 percent, 23 percent, and 25 percent of total legal immigration. These percentages do not equal the percentages of immigrants who came from Ireland between 1820 and 1860 or from Germany in the 1850s and 1860s. Yet they are high compared to the very dispersed sources of immigrants before World War I and compared to other contemporary immigrants. And to them must be added the large numbers of Mexicans who each year enter the United States illegally." [Who Are We? : The Challenges to America's National Identity, p. 223, 2004]

  • Germans And Irish Accounted For Almost Seven Out Of Ten Foreign Born In The U.S. In 1860. According to Coming to America: a history of immigration and ethnicity in American life: "Between them, Germans and Irish were almost seven out of ten foreign born in [1860], 69.8 percent, and more than four out of ten in [1900], 41.4 percent. Never again would two ethnic groups so dominate immigration." [Coming to America: a history of immigration and ethnicity in American life, p. 146, 2002]

Huntington: If Mexican Immigration Stopped, Immigrants Would No Longer Be A Burden On The Government. According to Who Are We? : The Challenges to America's National Identity: "if one assumes that other immigration continues as it has but that somehow Mexican immigration abruptly stopped...the debate over whether immigrants were an economic burden on state and federal governments would be decisively resolved in the negative. The average education and skills of the immigrants coming to America and those continuing to come would rise to levels unprecedented in American history." [Who Are We? : The Challenges to America's National Identity, p. 243, 2004]

Huntington: "Evangelical Protestantism" Is Helping Mexicans Make The Cultural Changes Necessary To "Join The Modern World." Sam Huntington wrote in his book Who Are We?: "A 'cultural revolution' is necessary, Armando Cíntora says, if Mexico is to join the modern world. While the values of Mexicans are undoubtedly evolving, helped by the spread of evangelical Protestantism, that revolution is unlikely to be completed soon or quickly." [Who Are We?: The Challenges to America's National Identity, pp. 254, 2004]

Hispanics' "Conversion To Evangelical Protestantism" Is "A Most Significant Manifestation Of [Their] Assimilation" Into American Society. According to Who Are We? : The Challenges to America's National Identity: "the ultimate criterion of assimilation is the extent to which immigrants identify with the United States as a country, believe in its Creed, espouse its culture, and correspondingly reject loyalty to other countries and their values and cultures...unquestionably, a most significant manifestation of assimilation for Hispanic immigrants is conversion to evangelical Protestantism." [Who Are We? : The Challenges to America's National Identity, pp. 241, 2004]

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