Gov. Scott Celebrates Anti-Abortion Laws That 'Create Choice'

August 01, 2011 12:31 pm ET — Kate Conway

Gov. Rick Scott

The Miami Herald's political blog, Naked Politics, reports that Gov. Rick Scott (R-FL) flaunted the passage of a slew of anti-choice bills during the previous legislative session by holding a party at the governor's mansion.

Gov. Rick Scott on Saturday hosted a celebration of the four new laws intended to limit access to abortion. Dozens of pro-life activists gathered at the manion [sic] for the event, along with several of the bill's sponsors and supporters.

The state filed at least 18 bills attempting to restrict abortion this year, but Florida's crusade to limit women's access isn't unique. Since the 2010 elections, the states have taken up hundreds of anti-abortion proposals, often under the guise of protecting women or granting them access to choices about their pregnancies.

Scott himself subscribes to the logic that making it more difficult to choose to terminate a pregnancy qualifies as 'creating choice':

Lawmakers passed five abortion-related bills in the 2011 session. One requires women to receive an ultrasound before undergoing an abortion and be offered the opportunity to have it described to her. [...]

Asked what his response it to those who say the laws limit choice for women, Gov. Scott referred to the ultrasound bill, passed by a previous Legislature but vetoed by then Gov. Charlie Crist. "You should have the opportunity to see see [sic] an ultrasound of your child," Scott said. "It's your choice. You don't have to. This creates choice. I think it's very positive."

Of course, pregnant women already have the opportunity to see an ultrasound; even those without private insurance who can't afford one can have an ultrasound paid for by Florida's Medicaid services. (Scott, remember, wants to reduce Medicaid eligibility.) It requires a special sort of perverse logic to construe a bill that will force women to undergo a medically unnecessary procedure as an "opportunity" that "creates choice."

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