Rep. Cantor Calls The Stimulus "An Utter Failure" At His Stimulus-Fueled Job Fair

November 24, 2009 11:09 am ET — Matt Finkelstein

Without the stimulus, Rep. Cantor's job fair would have been a lot smaller.

Since the beginning of the year, House Minority Whip Eric Cantor (R-VA) has been a bitter critic of the Obama administration's economic recovery efforts.  He was quick to declare that the stimulus package "did not" work and even suggested canceling the rest of the program.  In recent weeks, Cantor has repeatedly attacked the administration for not focusing enough on job creation. 

Yesterday, Cantor hosted a job fair in Culpeper, VA -- much like the one he held in August -- to give "Virginians the chance to get their lives back on track." At the event, Cantor took another opportunity to rail against the stimulus, calling it an "utter failure." As reported by the Star-Exponent:

Asked if he thought the economy was getting better as growth in the gross domestic product seems to indicate, Cantor said no. [...]

Cantor, as he has repeatedly in recent weeks and months, condemned the $787 billion stimulus package passed by Congress in February as "an utter failure."

But, according to the Washington Post, "nearly half" of the employers at Cantor's job fair received stimulus funding:

The list includes a slew of government agencies and schools that have directly benefited from the package and may be using stimulus money to hire people (as the money was originally designed to do), including the Orange County public schools, the Transportation Security Administration and Virginia Department of Labor, and some companies that may have indirectly benefited such as Comcast and Terremark.

Cantor's hypocrisy regarding the stimulus is old news, but that doesn't make it any less deplorable. A spokesman from the DCCC added, "If Representative Cantor's 'Party of No' policies were in effect, this event would have been an unemployment fair not a jobs fair."

Despite Cantor's grandstanding, the New York Times reported last week that among neutral economists, there's an emerging "consensus that the stimulus package, messy as it is, is working."

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